Utah Shakespearean Festival: Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice set

The set of Pride and Prejudice in the Randall L. Jones Theatre

Pride and Prejudice posterHaving already seen The 39 Steps and Much Ado about Nothing, we were looking forward to Pride and Prejudice to finish our two days at the Utah Shakespearean Festival. Pride and Prejudice is a novel by Jane Austen. It was begun in 1796, her second novel, but her first serious attempt at publication. She finished the original manuscript by 1797 in Steventon, Hampshire, where she lived with her parents and siblings in the town rectory. Austen originally called the story First Impressions, but it was never published under that title; instead, she made extensive revisions to the manuscript, then retitled and eventually published it as Pride and Prejudice.

The play is adapted by Joseph Hanreddy and J. R. Sullivan and directed by B. J. Jones. The Utah Shakespearean Festival website has this to say:

Mr. and Mrs. Bennet are desperate. With no sons, they are determined to arrange profitable marriages for their five beautiful daughters. However, when two eligible young men arrive in the neighborhood, excitement and passion begin to rule; and the Bennet household is in danger of being tipped firmly on its end. Fully capturing the spirit of the classic book, this adaptation is delightful, romantic, and fun for the entire family.

My wife owns the notable 1995 television version produced by the BBC starring Jennifer Ehle and Colin Firth. Also the 2005 movie starring Keira Knightley (in an Oscar-nominated performance) and Matthew Macfadyen. She also has the book. So it was destined that she would see the play.

For me, already knowing the plot and the ending, didn’t spoil the play. The interest now is not in what happens but how the story is told. It seemed to me that all the story was covered — I did not notice anything that was left out. But I do not think I would catch omissions anyway as I have not read the book.

Wikipedia has an interesting Pride and Prejudice Character Map showing the relationships between characters.
Pride and Prejudice Character Map

Next: The Greenshow
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Utah Shakespearean Festival: Much Ado about Nothing

Much Ado about Nothing poster
For our 30th anniversary Jill and I spent two days in Cedar City this week. Monday afternoon at the Utah Shakespearean Festival we watched The 39 Steps. In the evening it was time for Much Ado about Nothing, a comedy by William Shakespeare about two pairs of lovers, Benedick and Beatrice, and Claudio and Hero.

The play is directed by B. J. Jones. The Utah Shakespearean Festival website has this to say:

Meet Beatrice and Benedick. To them love is a game of wits. Then meet Hero and Claudio. To them love is, well . . . just love. This vibrant and comic celebration of life and romance will introduce you to these opposite lovers, and to a host of villains, clowns, and eccentric characters. And you will cheer when these lively couples finally learn realities about life, love—and themselves.

The play is shown in the Adams Shakespearean Theatre, dedicated in 1977. It is patterned after drawings and research of sixteenth century Tudor stages. Experts say it is one of a few theatres that probably comes close to the design of the Globe Theatre in which Shakespeare’s plays were originally produced.

I found watching Much Ado about Nothing in an open air theater just adds to the experience. The play was very entertaining and funny. Sometimes, watching Shakespeare drags for me, being the uncouth man that I am, but I enjoyed this play and the time was gone all too soon.

Next: Pride and Prejudice
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Utah Shakespearean Festival: The 39 Steps

Utah Shakespearean Festival posters

For our 30th anniversary Jill and I spent two days in Cedar City. Our first stop was the play The 39 Steps showing at the Utah Shakespearean Festival. The original was the 1935 British thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, loosely based on the adventure novel The Thirty-nine Steps by John Buchan. The film stars Robert Donat and Madeleine Carroll.

Utah Shakespearean Festival bannerThe play was adapted by Patrick Barlow from the novel and is directed by Eli Simon. The Utah Shakespearean Festival website has this to say:

What do you get when you blend Alfred Hitchcock with Monty Python? A hilarious mystery spoof that will keep you guessing! Murder, betrayal, and espionage intertwine with sly and hysterical nods to many of Hitchcock’s films, resulting in one of the funniest plays to ever hit Broadway. See if you can figure out whodunit as this cast of four transforms into over 150 farcical characters!

It took me awhile to catch on but there are only four actors in the play. This is where a lot of the humor is involved as characters, at times, are switched at a frenetic pace. There were an amazing amount of costume changes as there are over 150 characters.

It was clever (and funny) how the train and car rides were simulated. At one point, one of the actors was so funny that the other actors had a great deal of trouble keeping a straight face. This set off the audience laughing anew.

This mystery spoof is intertwined with sly and hysterical nods to many of Hitchcock’s films. Most of these had gone over my head before I finally caught on.

Really, my theater ticket was wasted on me.

Next: Much Ado about Nothing
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This Is What 30 Years Of Marriage Looks Like

Jill and Rick
The time has flown by and in the process we have produced five children and they in turn have given us three grandchildren — so far. I don’t really have too much advice for newly married couples except to tell you to make sure you go to church together often. In my church on a Sunday the men meet separately for part of the time and quite often we will be reminded to honor and respect womanhood and to tell our wives that we love them.

And over the pulpit a couple will hear how debt is worse than the plague, how they should work hard, that they should nurture and provide for their family, and not rely on government.

So while most of the credit goes to Jill for making our marriage great, the Church and its supportive members have to be recognized for the great contributions they have made to our marriage.

Our favorite daughter-in-law honored us on her blog today over at Ada Shot Me.

Update

At the year of writing (2010) we had only one daughter-in-law. But now we have two more, also favorites.
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Bryson Visits Hogle Zoo

Last Wednesday Jill and I took Bryson to visit Hogle Zoo in Salt Lake City. The weather was cooler than normal, making the afternoon temperatures just right. We enjoyed seeing the animals with Bryson and took a few photographs and a video. Click on the images to enlarge.

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Merry Go Round Video


Hogle Zoo
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Wasatch Mountain State Park

I wanted to take my grandchildren camping so I made reservations for two campsites. I then invited the parents to go and before the day was out they were ready for the trip. So last weekend we went to Wasatch Mountain State Park. We camped overnight at Little Deer Creek Campground.

Here are a few of the photographs and videos taken by Steven, Jill, and Rick. Click on the images to enlarge. If you cannot see the videos, click here.

We unloaded and pitched the tents. We were only staying overnight but it seemed like we had food for a week. That’s Jill by the picnic table. The campsites were large, had running water, and some had shade. We had quite a view.

Wasatch Mountain State Park

I brought plenty of wood for a fire to cook our hot-dogs.

Wasatch Mountain State Park

Aurora was ready to eat…

Wasatch Mountain State Park

…just about anything.

Wasatch Mountain State Park

After we ate Bryson and Aurora put to good use the local materials that were lying around. Aurora used her truck to level the ground.

Wasatch Mountain State Park



We had lots of adults to go around when the grandchildren needed to be held. Here is Sarah with Aurora.

Wasatch Mountain State Park

Steven with Cassandra. Steven is the one on the right.

Wasatch Mountain State Park

Derek with Bryson.

Wasatch Mountain State Park

And me.

Wasatch Mountain State Park

We retired to our tents while Jake slept out in the open.

Wasatch Mountain State Park

In the morning, before breakfast, Derek took Bryson for a walk.

Wasatch Mountain State Park

Jake is a handy guy to have around when you are hungry for some ham.

Wasatch Mountain State Park

Sarah appears to be enjoying her breakfast.

Wasatch Mountain State Park

Any left for me?

Wasatch Mountain State Park

Before noon we broke camp and drove a few miles onto federal land to visit Cascade Springs in Uinta National Forest. The trail through Cascade Springs consists primarily of a raised boardwalk which crosses over a series of clear shallow pools. Calcite mineral deposits accumulated and formed terraces over which the water cascades.

Adelaide holds Cassandra, who didn’t really want to see running water just right now.

Cascade Springs

Jill loves the outdoors…

Cascade Springs

…while Cassandra has yet to make up her mind.

Cascade Springs

I do believe we will go camping again. There is no better way to spend the weekend than with family.

Cascade Springs

The water coming from the springs has made a long journey from limestone caverns deep within the earth. Forced through cracks and fissures, the water emerges here as “travertine”. The deposits have gradually accumulated to make the terraces for the pools at Cascade Springs. Approximately seven and one-half million gallons flow from the springs each day.


The Mueller Park Trail

Mueller Park Trail

Today we hiked The Mueller Park Trail in Bountiful. It is a great walk that is mostly shaded all the way up. Much of the trail is gently sloped. From various locations there are good views of the Great Salt Lake and the valley far below.

The Mueller Park Trail is 13 miles round trip. The route begins at the Mueller Park Picnic Grounds in the east Bountiful foothills and ends at a small grassy clearing called Rudy’s Flat. We chose to turn around at Big Rock, called “Elephant Rock” by the locals, to make it a 7 mile round trip.

Mueller Park Trail can be busy on weekends and holidays. Its multi-use designation means it’s open to hikers, mountain bikers, and motorcycles. Today we were passed by numerous bikers.

Click on the images to enlarge. In the video Jill explains what we are doing.

Mueller Park Trail

Jill at the trailhead


Mueller Park Trail

Susan, Shauna, Jill, and Mike begin the ascent

Mueller Park Trail

We are headed for Big Rock

Mueller Park Trail

Mueller Park Trail

Mueller Park Trail

Here we are just above Big Rock

Mueller Park Trail

Taking a break on the bench above Big Rock to admire the view

Mueller Park Trail

Mueller Park Trail

JIll says, "I'll race you down!"


Mueller Park Trail

Goodbye folks, I'm glad you could join us on the Mueller Park Trail. Photo by Susan Ward

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City Creek Canyon Trail

Yesterday found us walking along City Creek Canyon Trail. City Creek was the first water source used by the Mormon Pioneers settling the Salt Lake Valley in 1847. In the early years water flowed through ditches for irrigating gardens. Residents hand dipped water for their culinary and domestic needs. In 1866, City Creek was first diverted into a municipally-owned, piped water distribution system to provide fire protection and culinary water supply to city residents.

The maximum recorded flow in City Creek during the floods of 1983 was 322 cubic feet per second, which resulted in considerable debris flows, flooding and damage through downtown Salt Lake City as State Street was converted into a temporary “river” after debris clogged the city’s storm drain pipes.

We walked up the road 2.5 miles and back again. So not many photographs (click to enlarge). The first two shots about sum it up:

City Creek Canyon Trail

Going up. Shauna, Jill, Susan, and Mike.

City Creek Canyon Trail

Coming down. Susan, Shauna, and Jill.

Mike carried on when we turned back. However, we did find a concrete staircase built in the middle of the wilderness by a lost civilization.

City Creek Canyon Trail

City Creek Canyon Trail

We stopped for lunch.

City Creek Canyon Trail

We sent Shauna out over a rotting log to find the trail but there was none.

City Creek Canyon Trail

The girls found a geocache by a big tree stump.

City Creek Canyon Trail

I love it when the directions say, "You will find it by the tree down by the river"

City Creek Canyon Trail

Mike went on to Area 26, about a 10 mile round trip.


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The View From The Living Room

View From The Living Room

View From The Living Room

On Monday, for a view of the Salt Lake Valley, we hiked to The Living Room. We relaxed in sandstone chairs with armrests. There were even coffee tables we parked our feet on.

The hike takes about two hours (it took us longer). It is considered easy (it isn’t). Trail length is 2.3 miles (seemed like 5 miles).

Here are some photographs of our hike. Click on the images to enlarge.

My nieces Shauna and Connie on the trail

My nieces Shauna and Connie on the trail

Mark photographing the view

Mark photographing the view

My brother Mike works his way to the top

My brother Mike works his way to the top

Mark, Connie, and Shauna ahead of us across the canyon.

Mark, Connie, and Shauna ahead of us across the canyon.

Susan and Jill behind us

Susan and Jill behind us

The Living Room Hike

Shauna in the living room

Mike captures the living room view

Mike captures the living room view

Mark and Connie eat a snack in the kitchen

Mark and Connie eat a snack in the kitchen

Jill wonders what happened to the television

Jill wonders what happened to the television

A beautiful view

A beautiful view

Susan and Shauna did some geocaching

Susan and Shauna did some geocaching

The mandatory group photograph

The mandatory group photograph

Left to right: Jill, Rick, Kent, Connie, Mark, Susan, Melissa, and Shauna.

Jill on her way down

Jill on her way down

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