Archives for August 2009

How Many Toys Does It Take To Entertain Aurora?

As many as you can possibly find! Yesterday evening 6 month old Aurora came to visit her grandparents. So we got out a few toys to occupy her.
Aurora checks out the toys that surround her.
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Missionary Dan Email #29 from Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

Presented here are portions of Elder Daniel Willoughby’s twenty ninth email from the Mongolia Ulaanbaatar Mission. If anyone wishes to send Daniel a message, write it in the comments and I will make sure he receives it.


Daniel holding a pig on prep day.

Daniel holding a pig on a prep day in March.

Surgery

Thanks for all the cool pictures and the cool updates. It is always fun to read them. This week was quite an adventure. My new companion has to attend the doctor almost every day for his ear that recently had surgery. So with the main road closed etc. it has taken quite a bit of time out of missionary work, but none the less we did what we could. In all reality he isn’t supposed to be working at all (the doctor said), but that doesn’t seem to stop him.

Missionary Work

We are working to find some new investigators. It is somewhat discouraging to have so many people say they are busy but in time we’ll find success. Also people always go to the countryside. It is way cool that they can move in one day their entire house and have no one know where they went, but when missionary work is concerned it isn’t that cool.

My companion and I get along very well. He speaks no English at all which allows me to speak a lot. I’m at the point in the language where some days I speak well and understand most all things, and others days I can’t hardly speak and I understand nothing.

We met a lot with our new members and less actives to strengthen them. I was happy when they came to church. We’ve also ran into a few old investigators that now have the opportunity to get baptized as before they weren’t able to. It is always fun to find out who their first missionaries were.

A Dream

I had a crazy dream last night, that I was home in America. Everyone asked me why I came home. All I could say was, “I don’t know — Arhhh!!” I was so upset that I started to call my mission president to send me back. I woke up right when I started to call him and was relieved to still be in Mongolia. Ha ha. That was exciting. Did that happen to anyone else when they were on their missions?

To Derek

Thanks for sharing that story. No worries about taking up my time, I like hearing from you. I haven’t had quite an investigator like that, but there have been a few that have made doing missionary work worth it. That is a sweet car. My companion likes it.

To Mom

The normal mail gets here perfectly fine. It doesn’t matter how much time it takes as I’ll be here for another year or so. :) I don’t really want anything so that is all good and well. Maybe some Gatorade powder. Can you also send me your side of the story of how you met dad. :) Thanks.

To Dad

Hey thanks for the awesome emails. I’ve been wanting to ask for awhile but keep forgetting. Lots of people find it fascinating that you are from England and are a convert and went to America etc. Could you send me your conversion story etc. and how you met mom? I have a basic idea but thats about it. Thanks!

Well that’s all for this week. Sorry no pictures this week as I forgot my camera. I didn’t really take any either.

Love, Elder Willoughby

Related Articles

List of Daniel’s missionary posts.
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Jake Skydives in Ogden

My son Jake called us today from the Ogden Skydiving Center. He said come quickly to watch him skydive. We arrived as his plane was taking off. Here is his account.


Jake tandem skydiving over Ogden

Jake tandem skydiving over Ogden

Invitation To Skydive

Matt Hall invited me earlier this week to go skydiving, it is one of those things I have always wanted to do in my life so I answered “Yes” without hesitation. After thinking I added, “If my grades are good enough to keep my scholarship.” Matt picked me up and we arrived and we signed up with the group. In order to fly I had to sign a liability contract, initialing every paragraph and also writing a statement saying I understood that I might be seriously injured or even die. The instructor gave the first time jumpers a few tips: crouch by the door and don’t hold on to anything; put your head slightly back and let the instructor jump; after leaving the plane make sure you arch by pushing your hips forward and bending your legs back; when landing hold your legs out in front so you can glide to a stop.

Why Am I Doing This?

Skydive Ogden plane.

Matt and I got assigned to the last of four plane rides, so I was able to see a few jumps before I went up. My jump buddy suited me up and we were the first into the plane. The plane took off and circled along the mountains climbing to about 11,500 feet. When over the airport once again, they opened the plane and the first few people dived out of the plane. That is probably the only time I thought, “I am crazy, why am I doing this?” But it quickly passed.

The other jumpers jumped rather quickly and without incident. When my time came I did as I was instructed and we did three flips out of the plane and then stabilized. My jump buddy showed my how to steer as we were free falling, and steering around I enjoyed the view and the feeling. It was just about the same as flying in a plane except there is no plane and the ground gets big really fast.

It Was A Blast

The instructor pulled the ripcord and we quickly jerked to a slow fall. After a few seconds he gave me the ropes and showed me how to control the chute. It was a blast going left then right and diving — I could even feel some G’s as I make the chute turn as tight as possible. Once we got closer to the ground the instructor took the ropes and glided us in close. There were already two people on the landing grass, so my instructor yelled, “Look out!” and glided us between the two. We quickly vacated the grass so people behind could land.

Flying around thousands of feet in the air is a blast! I hope to be able to do it again soon.


Paul, Jake's brother, waiting by the hangar.

Paul, Jake’s brother, waiting by the hangar.

Jake's skydiving plane takes off.

Jake and Matt’s skydiving plane takes off.

Skydiving photographer comes in first to land.

One of the skydiving photographers comes in first to land.

Jake near the end of his first skydive.

Jake near the end of his first skydive.

Jake lands from his skydive.

Jake lands from his skydive.

Matt and Jake receive skydiving certificates.

Matt and Jake receive skydiving certificates.

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Missionary Dan Email #28 from Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

Presented here are portions of Elder Daniel Willoughby’s twenty eighth email from the Mongolia Ulaanbaatar Mission. If anyone wishes to send Daniel a message, write it in the comments and I will make sure he receives it.


Daniel and companion in Ulaanbataar.

Daniel (left) and companion in Ulaanbataar.

Transfers

Sorry for the delayed email. Yesterday when we went to the Internet it wasn’t working. We went to three places and they all weren’t working. So I have a few minutes right now. Elder Henson, my companion got transferred Saturday. I stayed in the area and Od Bayar is my new companion. He is in the same group, which is cool. We get along great, he likes to exercise so I’ll start doing that again. As for the first transfer in a mission, mine was great. Some people think it’s hard. It’s different for everyone.

Happy Anniversary

The fair looked like it was tons of fun. The pictures are awesome to look at too. Thanks for sending them. That’s a big TV too, by the way. Happy anniversary! [Rickety note: Jill wanted a big screen TV for our anniversary]

Secret American Store

There is plenty of clothes here to buy and traditional Mongolian clothing. I think the shipping cost is enormously high though. I’ll ask some other missionaries to see what they have done to see what’s best. Elder Henson showed me a secret American store, so we bought a big thing of pancake mix. That is really good. We eat lamb a lot still though. It isn’t my first choice of meat to eat but I can’t complain.

Well. Got to go. I’ll hopefully get to write a good response next week.

Love, Elder Willoughby

Related Articles

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Bryson Crawls to First Place at Davis County Fair

Friday found me at the Davis County Fair with my two grandchildren Bryson and Aurora. Adelaide entered Aurora in the baby contest as did Sarah with Bryson. No winners there. Sarah then entered Bryson in the crawling race. That was much more fun, at least for the adults. Bryson had to crawl across a stage towards his mother in a race with three other babies. Here are the photographs recording the event. The light and distance was confusing for the camera (or maybe for the photographer) so the pictures are not that great a quality. Click on the photographs for a larger image.


Bryson competes at the Davis County Fair

Bryson, in the yellow, looks over at the competition.

Bryson competes at the Davis County Fair

They’re off! Bryson takes an early lead.

Bryson competes at the Davis County Fair

Bryson is stalled and cries for help. No worries, the other competitors are stuck at the start.

Bryson competes at the Davis County Fair

Miss pink can’t get her engine in gear but blue and brown stripes has raced way ahead.
Sarah waves her cell phone in an effort to get Bryson to come to her.
Bryson hits the turbo charger and heads for the cell phone.

Bryson competes at the Davis County Fair

It is a photo-finish as Bryson storms in to take the checkered flag (and the cell phone).

Bryson competes at the Davis County Fair

The winner! But the champion is more interested in the cell phone.

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Missionary Dan Email #27 from Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

Presented here are portions of Elder Daniel Willoughby’s twenty seventh email from the Mongolia Ulaanbaatar Mission. If anyone wishes to send Daniel a message, write it in the comments and I will make sure he receives it.


Daniel on a mount overlooking Ulaanbataar.

Daniel (right) on a mount overlooking Ulaanbataar.

The Difference In Derek

Thanks for all the awesome pictures. I really enjoyed them. The only difference I can see in Derek is that… his bow tie is cricked…. Oh wait that’s a tie. Ummm… he shaved that day? He started eating baby food? He isn’t wearing a missionary tag? I don’t know looks the same to me.

Missionary Work

This week felt like it was a month. It was a really strange feeling. Our part-member’s husband, Tortogdokh, got baptized this week. He was an awesome investigator the whole time we taught him. He had a great baptismal day as well. His wife was excited for him to become a member and so were some other missionaries that had tried to get him baptized for months.


Baptism of Tortogdokh

Baptism of Tortogdokh

While we were waiting for our ALA family to get home on Thursday we decided to climb up the mountain near their house. We raced to the top, took a few pictures and then headed back down. When we got to the bottom another member that lived in that area called after us. We at first ignored him because it isn’t unusual for people to call after us. We decided to stop and see what he wanted. He turned out to be a member of the Church who was baptized about 8 years ago. He invited us in and fed us really fast as we listened to what he had to say. He had a son that served a mission as well. He hadn’t been going to church lately because he had moved so we invited him back. It was great that our little hike turned out to be really productive.

We also were able to go on an exchange Friday to double our efforts with the work. My companion went with the new senior couple missionaries and I went with a mini missionary. The day was great and we accomplished a lot. The senior couple also really enjoyed themselves and impressively could bear their testimonies quite well.

Our recently baptized member invited us over to dinner yesterday. We went with some missionaries that are going home this week. His wife was their new member about a year ago and the missionaries came to say good bye. The food was good but my companion and I unfortunately got food poisoning. So last night was quite the adventure with our stomach’s discarding the food as it felt it needed to. We originally planned to go to the country side today, but instead did our best to recover. We are both doing good now, just a little tired.

The youth right now go to mutual and things like that. They had youth conference about 2 months ago. They seem to do similar things as we do in America. Most of them are starting up school here soon.
Love, Elder Willoughby
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Missionary Dan Email #26 from Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

Presented here are portions of Elder Daniel Willoughby’s twenty sixth email from the Mongolia Ulaanbaatar Mission. If anyone wishes to send Daniel a message, write it in the comments and I will make sure he receives it.


Daniel ready to baptize Anojin in Ulaanbataar.

Daniel ready to baptize Anojin in Ulaanbataar.

Wedding

Those pictures of the wedding turned out great. Congratulations Alex! I also really like the picture of Sarah and Derek with the sun. It looks professionally done. Thanks for all the emails they are always fun to read.

Missionary Work

So this week we had one of our less-active member’s daughters baptized. She gave a talk at her daughter’s baptism so it was a good experience for the family. It was neat as we traveled to her baptism. We started with just Anojin, the one being baptized, and left her house. We gathered two of her friends shortly after and continued on. Her brother was walking home so we picked him up as well. When we got off the bus we met one investigator and member and headed towards the church. We helped a car that was stuck out of the mud and by then two of our less active members had joined us. It was really neat to walk the rest of the way to church with so many people to go to the baptism.

Sunday was similar, many of our less actives came and over half of the new members in our area came as well. It was a great fast and testimony meeting and I was glad that so many of the people we’d been serving were able to be there. The Lord has greatly blessed us in our efforts and I know He always gives us help when we ask.

Other exciting news is that we walked down a street and a member that just recently got out of prison came up to us and said he wanted to go back to church. That doesn’t happy very often. :) We will continue to do the best we can. Enjoy the awesome pictures!

To Adelaide

Its really cool you read my emails to Aurora. It’d be sweet to have her know my name. That reminds me of a little kid in the old ward I was in. We visited his house a lot and played with him. He was just barely starting to talk. After I was transferred and I saw him at church, he ran up to me and said, “My older brother, my older brother, my older brother.” It was way cool and he continues to do it every time I see him. It is way cute (I usually don’t say the word cute but it describes it well). Thanks for the great email!

To Kelsey S.

Hey! How are you? So it seems like they discontinued the pouch system here in Mongolia and the only mail they now send is strictly church business. I think my companion knows how to send letters through the Mongolian mail system so I’ll see if I can do that today. Thanks for your continued support. Until then, keep smiling and tell Jake (my brother) to calm down. Oh and tell Paul to take a nap. :)

Love, Elder Willoughby
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1.3 Billion Wind Turbines Needed to Replace Coal

McFadden Ridge Wind Project

Tennessee wind turbines similar to McFadden Ridge
Tennessee wind turbines similar to McFadden Ridge

Construction of Rocky Mountain Power’s McFadden Ridge I wind project is underway in Albany County, Wyoming, near the towns of McFadden and Rock River. The project consists of 19 General Electric wind turbines, capable of generating a combined 28.5 megawatts of electricity.

See the Update section at the end of this post for a recalculation of the number of wind turbines needed to replace coal.

1.3 Billion Wind Turbines Needed

Now for a little back-of-the-envelope math. The McFadden Ridge project has 19 wind turbines producing 28.5 megawatts of electricity. Each wind generator therefore produces 1.5 megawatts. In the United States in 2007 coal was responsible for generating 2,016,456 gigawatts of power (see USA Electricity Generation 2007 Chart). As 1 gigawatt equals 1,000 megawatts you would need 1.3 billion (2,016,456,000 megawatts / 1.5) wind turbines to replace coal. And coal only accounts for 48% of electricity production.

651 Million More Wind Turbines

Petroleum liquids (49,505,000 megawatts), petroleum coke (16,234,000 megawatts), natural gas (896,590,000 megawatts), and other gases (13,453,000 megawatts) account for a total of 975,782,000 megawatts. To replace these sources of power you would need an additional 650,521,333 wind turbines. In these calculations we are not replacing the 21% of electricity generated from nuclear power. Even so, removing fossil fuels from the equation mandates the need for 2 billion wind turbines. And remember, wind power costs twice as much as electricity from coal.

Growing Electricity Needs

Rocky Mountain Power says:

To meet the growing electricity needs of its customers, Rocky Mountain Power is investing in new generation, transmission and distribution facilities in Wyoming and other states, as well as purchasing the output from wind projects owned by other entities.

These wind projects are to meet the growing electricity needs of its customers, not to replace coal generating plants. Construction of the McFadden Ridge I wind project is not even included in the 2 billion number cited. The wind turbines being constructed today are to meet growing demand, some of which will be met by even more expensive solar power. I would be very careful about trusting politicians that want to eliminate fossil fuels without giving an explanation of how we are going to replace them with the needed 2 billion wind turbines.

But whatever happens, please don’t put me in charge of turbine maintenance.

Update

A co-worker, Josh, pointed out to me that my calculations were wrong. First the 1.5 megawatts output of the wind turbine needs to be multiplied by the number of hours in a year. Then the ratio of the maximum possible output to the typical output, called the capacity factor, needs to be calculated. For our purposes I will use a capacity factor of 30%. So now we arrive at the following:

1.5 megawatts x 24 hours x 365 days x 0.3 capacity factor = 3,942 megawatt hours.

Now with a more realistic divisor we arrive at the number of wind turbines needed to replace coal:

2,016,456,000 megawatt hours / 3,942 megawatt hours = 511,531 wind turbines.

I still don’t want to be in charge of turbine maintenance.

External Articles

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