100 Years Ago: George V, Freece, Silver Service Fund

The following was adapted from the Improvement Era magazine of August 1911.

King George V

King George V

George V in coronation robes, painting by Samuel Luke Fildes

King George V received the crown of his ancestors on Thursday, June 22, in Westminster Abbey, amid the manifestations of love and loyalty from the people on every hand. Without a hitch, and with every circumstance of historic pomp, the ceremony was consummated, and with thunderous cheers the great multitudes of Britain acclaimed their crowned and anointed sovereigns, and sang, “God Save the King.”

In the abbey were assembled dignitaries of the empire, foreign and colonial representatives, members of European royal families, peers, members of parliament and officials–about seven thousand people. The ceremony was substantially the same used for similar occasions for a thousand years. There was a brief sermon by the Archbishop of York, the king kissed the Bible and signed the oath, made his declaration of faith in its recently modified form, and was anointed and crowned, ascended the throne, and the queen took her seat beside, but below, her husband.

The following day the king and queen made their royal progress through the streets of London, being welcomed with demonstrations of enthusiasm by the people.

[George Frederick Ernest Albert, from 6 May 1910 until his death in 1936, was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions, and Emperor of India. George was a grandson of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert and the first cousin of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany.

In 1917, because of anti-German public sentiment he renamed the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha the House of Windsor. It remains the family name of the current Royal Family. George V was plagued by illness throughout much of his later reign and at his death was succeeded by his eldest son, Edward VIII.]

Freece the Agitator

Freece, the Anti-Mormon Agitator, has gone to Denmark, and met a cold reception. Elder A. J. T. Sorenson, president of the Copenhagen conference, in a recent letter, says that the priests are giving them blows from all sides, but the gospel, like as steel, becomes firmer in the hearts of the people the more it is pounded.

Politiken, a leading liberal newspaper, recently defended the elders against an attack of Freece, the anti-Mormon, who had called a large meeting to denounce the Latter-day Saints. At a private meeting following, held with the reporters and priests, the elders were given an opportunity to defend their cause, and came out of it so well that the paper gave them a splendid defense. Among other things it counseled Mr. Freece to pack his grip, and return to America, where conditions are more fruitful for his class of agitation.

[Hans Peter Freece, the son of a Utah Mormon polygamist, openly supported anti-Mormon agitation and the drafting of legislation to ban the Mormon religion from being preached and practiced.]

Silver Service Fund

Contributions for the Silver Service Fund of the battleship Utah, have been received from 26,066 school children in Utah, aggregating $2,233.72. All the counties of the state and about 230 cities, towns and villages are represented in the donations.

The price of the service will be $10,000 on which account the contributions will be applied. The remainder will be paid by the State. Utah is 521 feet six inches long, draws 29 feet of water, is rated as a 22,000 ton ship, and will carry 940 men and 60 officers, when fully manned. The ship will be ready to go into commission August 10.

[USS Utah was attacked and sunk by a torpedo in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941.]

Adapted from: “Passing Events”, Improvement Era, Vol. XIV. August, 1911. No. 10.

USS Utah

USS Utah

Rickety signature.

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