Dinosaurs at Hogle Zoo

Tyrannosaurus Rex

Yesterday’s visit to Hogle Zoo with Jill, Adelaide, and my grandchildren found us encountering dinosaurs. Their heads and necks moved and they made noises so as to appear more life-like. The Dilophosaurus even spit water out of its mouth which scared my granddaughter Aurora and quite surprised me just as I was about to take its photograph.

The dinosaurs are presented in alphabetical order. If you click on the photographs, they will either show a larger version of the same photograph or a different shot of the same dinosaur.

Allosaurus

Allosaurus (different lizard) is the state fossil of Utah. The powerful skull of Allosaurus was a perfect meat-eating machine. The jaws were large and massive, with serrated teeth for cutting meat. The skull was composed of separated pieces that could be disjointed allowing him to swallow enormous chunks of meat whole. Allosaurus constantly grew, shed and replaced it teeth, some of which averaged three or four inches in length.

Allosaurus

Allosaurus

Dilophosaurus

Dilophosaurus (double-crested lizard) had colorful crests that could have been used to attract mates. In the movie Jurassic Park, Dilophosaurus paralyzed its prey by spitting blinding venom in the eyes. There is no evidence of this but it does make for a good story.

Dilophosaurus

Dilophosaurus with baby. They spit blinding venom in our eyes that felt a little like water.

Kentrosaurus

Kentrosaurus (sharp-point lizard) had plates along the low back tail that most likely served a defensive function. The tail had two pairs of sharp, two-foot spikes that were probably used for lashing out against predators. The plates may have had blood flowing through them to help heat and cool the dinosaur’s body.

Kentrosaurus

Kentrosaurus

Megalosaurus

Megalosaurus (great lizard) had curved teeth with a serrated edge and strong claws on each toe and finger. The curved claws were designed for seizing and holding prey, while the jaws were the main killing tool. Megalosaurus was the first dinosaur to be discovered, in England in 1676.

Megalosaurus

Megalosaurus

Parasaurolophus

Parasaurolophus (crested lizard) had a hollow head-crest that allowed it to make a sound like a trombone. The noise may have been used to “talk” to the rest of the herd, warning them about approaching predators.

Parasaurolophus

Parasaurolophus

Rhinosaurus

Rhinosaurus (horned nose) is characterized by its large size, an herbivorous diet, large horns, and a thick protective skin. The Rhinosaurus can exceed 7,700 pounds in weight and have a head and body length of 15 feet. They are extremely nearsighted; making the Rhinosaurus dangerous and unpredictable, and likely to charge unfamiliar sounds and smells.

Rhinosaurus

Rhinosaurus. This one looked the most life-like

Styracosaurus

Styracosaurus (spiked lizard) used its horns for defense and could charge like a rhino to protect itself. But because its frill was not solid bone and was easily punctured, some researchers theorize that it may have been able to flush the frill with blood creating eyespots to scare predators away.

Styracosaurus

Styracosaurus and baby

Tyrannosaurus Rex

Tyrannosaurus Rex (tyrant lizard king) was one of the largest animal predators. With a 5-foot-long head, 8-inch long teeth and a bite three times stronger than a lion’s, it could eat 200 pounds of meat in one bite. The little arms were extremely strong for holding on to struggling prey. It had a keen sense of smell, bone-crushing bites, and super speed.

Tyrannosaurus Rex

Tyrannosaurus Rex

 

Notes and News

  • Not shown here but on display at Hogle Zoo: Coelophysis, Suchmimus, and Brachiosaurus.
  • Dinosaur details are from onsite information displays.
  • At 1 pm we were fortunate to experience first-hand feeding time at the zoo.
  • An extensive multi-animal habitat, called Rocky Shores, featuring polar bears, sea lions, seals and brown bears will open in the Spring of 2012.

Rickety signature

There Are Differences Between Us

These photographs have some real differences to reconcile. See if you can help.

Spoiler Alert — don’t read the comments until after you find the differences.

Update: The solution has been posted in the comments. Remind me to make the next one more difficult.

A hat tip to Adelaide for giving me the idea.

Zoo Roundabout (original)

Zoo Roundabout (altered)

Rickety signature.

Our Grandchildren at Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Last Wednesday, along with Adelaide and Jill, I took my three grandchildren to Hogle Zoo. It hasn’t been long since we took Bryson to the zoo. Cassandra, the newborn, slept most of the time but she did wake up near the end. Aurora and Bryson seemed to have fun. There are a lot of new sights and sounds for them to see and hear. Aurora and Bryson got to ride the roundabout, the train, and the lions.

Hogle Zoo

We saw the baby elephant, Zuri, but we didn’t see the zoo’s black bears (Tuff, Cubby, and Dale) because they have been sent to the Oregon Zoo. What we did see was their home being demolished to make way for the new Rocky Shores Exhibit. According to the Deseret News, the new exhibit

will be an extensive multi-animal habitat featuring polar bears, sea lions, seals and possibly other bears. Up-close viewing of the animals as they swim by will be possible through glassed areas, as well as views from ground level in a habitat depicting the physical, cultural and social landscape of the western shores of North America. (“Hogle Zoo send away three bears to make way for construction,” Deseret News, May 2, 2010)

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Read Cassandra’s report of the zoo visit in Cassie’s World…It’s a Jungle Out There!
Rickety signature.