Patsy’s Mine Hike: Part 2

Patsy's Mine Hike

Melissa by Patsy's Mine entrance

On Friday we hiked to Patsy’s Mine in the mountains above Farmington. The trail to the mine is marked and we had no difficulty in finding the entrance. The mine does not go very far and most of the time you can stand upright, though in places one has to stoop. I found out how hard the rock is when I banged my head against it.

Patsy's Mine Hike

Melissa found the bat first. We wondered if it was rabid

There was a bat about 20 feet into the cave. We wondered if it was rabid. It must have been, to want to go hang from the roof of an old mine. Apparently exposure to rabid bats increases with the migration season. This year, four elementary-aged Davis County students have been exposed to a bat that could not be tested. Whenever bats aren’t able to be recovered or are too decomposed for testing, it is not known if they carried rabies. Therefore, to err on the side of caution the children are treated with post-exposure vaccine because the disease is virtually 100 percent fatal.

Patsy's Mine Hike

Melissa, Susan, and Jill with the mine entrance in the background

I walked past the bat and caused it to fly out of the cave past the girls which provoked an appropriate round of screaming. Further into the cave we could hear a faint rumbling sound. We thought maybe it was the freeway traffic or the train. We were a long way from the valley though.

The last time Jill and Susan visited the mine, they navigated by the light from their digital cameras. This time they were more prepared.


There is graffiti on the walls of the mine that in 2,000 years will have archeologists wondering what manner of intelligent life wrote it. They will be figuring that out for a long time.

Patsy's Mine Hike

The right fork is basically just a big puddle

The main tunnel is straight with a fork at the end. The right fork ends in a few paces and the only thing of interest is a rusty rail. The left fork does not go much further before ending. Off of the left tunnel is a small space where you can clamber through and stand upright. Nothing to get excited about.

Patsy's Mine Hike

The left fork soon comes to a dead end

According to the deep thinking and creative Chanelle (her blog no longer accessible), there is an old steam engine that has become hidden from the main trail with years of plant growth. If we had known this beforehand we would have searched for awhile to see if we could find it. According to Chanelle, copper is the most available mineral in the mountain. Shes writes that “…even though there are large quantities of it, the quality is lacking. Because of this, the mines in this area were abandoned and closed up.”

Patsy's Mine Hike

There is an opening in the left fork that goes nowhere

Patsy's Mine Hike

Patsy's Mine entrance. That's it for the tour

Patsy's Mine Hike

Jill says she enjoyed this mine and that she wouldn't mind finding another to explore

Rickety signature.

Patsy’s Mine Hike: Part 1

Patsy's Mine Hike

Melissa, Jill, Susan, and Rick at the entrance to Patsy's Mine

Yesterday we went to Patsy’s Mine above Farmington. It can be a pleasant hike — if you don’t get lost in the undergrowth, don’t have a heart attack on the steep rise, and don’t bang your head on the mine roof.

Getting to Patsy’s Mine

The trailhead begins at a rusty green gate on 1st. North and as far east as you can go in Farmington. At about 50 yards along the trail take the right fork. You rise steeply to eventually meet a dirt road. Cross the road and continue on the trail. After that follow the signs. The mine entrance is just south of and a little below the flag.

Patsy's Mine Hike

Taking a short cut following the 4 wheel drive tracks. Not recommended as we lost the trail

We took a wrong turn and followed 4 wheel drive tracks. When the tracks ended we had to work our way through the undergrowth and back on to the trail. The trail was steep in places but fortunately the old folks didn’t have a heart attack. I did drink more water than usual even though it wasn’t as hot a day as some other hikes. On the return trip we kept to the trail to give us an easy descent.

Patsy's Mine Hike

Susan finding a way around the undergrowth

Patsy's Mine Hike

Jill looking to find the trail. Must be somewhere up there

We eventually got back on the trail.


Patsy's Mine Hike

Me by the mine sign

In the next post I will have some photographs of inside the mine. Not much as mines or photographs go but it is fun to have something different at the end of a hike other than the view. And yes I did bang my head on the mine roof — don’t you do that.

Patsy's Mine Hike

Susan by the mine entrance

Patsy's Mine Hike

View of Farmington from the mine entrance

Rickety signature.

Deuel Creek North and South and Centerville Canyon

Deuel Creek Hike

View of Centerville from Centerville Canyon

On Friday Susan, Melissa, Jill and I took a pleasant hike up Centerville Canyon. We parked the car on the dirt road by the Deuel Creek North trailhead and ended up walking to the Deuel Creek South trailhead. So we began by following the south trail for about one mile to the junction of the north trail where on our way back we would descend on the north side of the creek.

Click on the images to enlarge and be sure to view the videos.

Deuel Creek Hike

Jill is as sure-footed as a mountain goat with her new walking stick

In places the trail is not maintained well. However, I think it adds to the enjoyment to have the possibility of falling off a cliff or two. If you make it to the first stream crossing, there are now eleven log footbridges at key crossings. The Centerville Hiker even put metal mesh on the wood to prevent slipping.

Deuel Creek Hike

Jill, Susan, and Melissa. Notice the metal mesh on the logs

From the junction we continued up the canyon for some distance. On the south side of the creek there is shade and the melodic sound of gently flowing water. Susan and Melissa found a geocache and signed the enclosed book.

Deuel Creek Hike

Give said the little stream as it hurried down the hill

Deuel Creek Hike

Turn right at the 589th tree, remove the grey colored rocks, and you will find the geocache

For directions you could follow the flag flying atop of the mountain. Does anyone know who placed it there?

Deuel Creek Hike

I wonder who unfurled this banner high on the mountain top?

The hike turns into the adult equivalent of the toddler that gets to run around at the park and play on the swing. That’s because there is a long rope swing hanging from a tall tree along the trail. After some of our party tried the swing we turned around and retraced our steps to the previously mentioned junction.

Deuel Creek Hike

Give Melissa enough rope and she will swing high into the trees



Deuel Creek Hike

Jill likes to hang around in the trees

On the north side of the creek Susan and Melissa searched among the rocks for another geocache. I don’t know if they found it because Jill and I went on ahead. The afternoon was getting hot and there was no shade except under our hats.

Deuel Creek Hike

Melissa looking for another geocache

Deuel Creek Hike

Melissa and Susan following our path back to the trailhead

Rickety signature.