Patsy’s Mine Hike: Part 1

Patsy's Mine Hike

Melissa, Jill, Susan, and Rick at the entrance to Patsy's Mine

Yesterday we went to Patsy’s Mine above Farmington. It can be a pleasant hike — if you don’t get lost in the undergrowth, don’t have a heart attack on the steep rise, and don’t bang your head on the mine roof.

Getting to Patsy’s Mine

The trailhead begins at a rusty green gate on 1st. North and as far east as you can go in Farmington. At about 50 yards along the trail take the right fork. You rise steeply to eventually meet a dirt road. Cross the road and continue on the trail. After that follow the signs. The mine entrance is just south of and a little below the flag.

Patsy's Mine Hike

Taking a short cut following the 4 wheel drive tracks. Not recommended as we lost the trail

We took a wrong turn and followed 4 wheel drive tracks. When the tracks ended we had to work our way through the undergrowth and back on to the trail. The trail was steep in places but fortunately the old folks didn’t have a heart attack. I did drink more water than usual even though it wasn’t as hot a day as some other hikes. On the return trip we kept to the trail to give us an easy descent.

Patsy's Mine Hike

Susan finding a way around the undergrowth

Patsy's Mine Hike

Jill looking to find the trail. Must be somewhere up there

We eventually got back on the trail.


Patsy's Mine Hike

Me by the mine sign

In the next post I will have some photographs of inside the mine. Not much as mines or photographs go but it is fun to have something different at the end of a hike other than the view. And yes I did bang my head on the mine roof — don’t you do that.

Patsy's Mine Hike

Susan by the mine entrance

Patsy's Mine Hike

View of Farmington from the mine entrance

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Deuel Creek North and South and Centerville Canyon

Deuel Creek Hike

View of Centerville from Centerville Canyon

On Friday Susan, Melissa, Jill and I took a pleasant hike up Centerville Canyon. We parked the car on the dirt road by the Deuel Creek North trailhead and ended up walking to the Deuel Creek South trailhead. So we began by following the south trail for about one mile to the junction of the north trail where on our way back we would descend on the north side of the creek.

Click on the images to enlarge and be sure to view the videos.

Deuel Creek Hike

Jill is as sure-footed as a mountain goat with her new walking stick

In places the trail is not maintained well. However, I think it adds to the enjoyment to have the possibility of falling off a cliff or two. If you make it to the first stream crossing, there are now eleven log footbridges at key crossings. The Centerville Hiker even put metal mesh on the wood to prevent slipping.

Deuel Creek Hike

Jill, Susan, and Melissa. Notice the metal mesh on the logs

From the junction we continued up the canyon for some distance. On the south side of the creek there is shade and the melodic sound of gently flowing water. Susan and Melissa found a geocache and signed the enclosed book.

Deuel Creek Hike

Give said the little stream as it hurried down the hill

Deuel Creek Hike

Turn right at the 589th tree, remove the grey colored rocks, and you will find the geocache

For directions you could follow the flag flying atop of the mountain. Does anyone know who placed it there?

Deuel Creek Hike

I wonder who unfurled this banner high on the mountain top?

The hike turns into the adult equivalent of the toddler that gets to run around at the park and play on the swing. That’s because there is a long rope swing hanging from a tall tree along the trail. After some of our party tried the swing we turned around and retraced our steps to the previously mentioned junction.

Deuel Creek Hike

Give Melissa enough rope and she will swing high into the trees



Deuel Creek Hike

Jill likes to hang around in the trees

On the north side of the creek Susan and Melissa searched among the rocks for another geocache. I don’t know if they found it because Jill and I went on ahead. The afternoon was getting hot and there was no shade except under our hats.

Deuel Creek Hike

Melissa looking for another geocache

Deuel Creek Hike

Melissa and Susan following our path back to the trailhead

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Our Grandchildren at Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Last Wednesday, along with Adelaide and Jill, I took my three grandchildren to Hogle Zoo. It hasn’t been long since we took Bryson to the zoo. Cassandra, the newborn, slept most of the time but she did wake up near the end. Aurora and Bryson seemed to have fun. There are a lot of new sights and sounds for them to see and hear. Aurora and Bryson got to ride the roundabout, the train, and the lions.

Hogle Zoo

We saw the baby elephant, Zuri, but we didn’t see the zoo’s black bears (Tuff, Cubby, and Dale) because they have been sent to the Oregon Zoo. What we did see was their home being demolished to make way for the new Rocky Shores Exhibit. According to the Deseret News, the new exhibit

will be an extensive multi-animal habitat featuring polar bears, sea lions, seals and possibly other bears. Up-close viewing of the animals as they swim by will be possible through glassed areas, as well as views from ground level in a habitat depicting the physical, cultural and social landscape of the western shores of North America. (“Hogle Zoo send away three bears to make way for construction,” Deseret News, May 2, 2010)

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Hogle Zoo

Read Cassandra’s report of the zoo visit in Cassie’s World…It’s a Jungle Out There!
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Parrish Canyon Fremont Pictograph Photographs

Parrish Canyon Fremont Pictographs

In the photograph above Connie illustrates what the canyon looks like by the pictographs. Not that it helps much I admit. There is a Forest Service marker at one point that warns you not to touch the rock art. We looked at the rock, and even took pictures, but we could not see any art in it at all. Mark went further up the canyon, climbed around some rocks, and found the pictographs.

Mike told us that it is best to come up in the Spring when the pictographs are freshly painted.

Parrish Canyon Fremont Pictographs

Parrish Canyon Fremont Pictographs

Parrish Canyon Fremont Pictographs

Parrish Canyon Fremont Pictographs

Parrish Canyon Fremont Pictographs
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Parrish Canyon Fremont Pictographs

Parrish Canyon Fremont Pictographs

At the trailhead: Mark, Connie, Kent, Melissa, Jill, Rick(ety), Mike, and Paul. Susan is on camera duty.

On Labor Day at 8 am nine adventurous souls set off to find the Parrish Canyon Fremont pictographs. The pictographs are not very far up the canyon. It was a little cold and Mark loaned Jill his coat. I am told it is a thirty minute hike but I didn’t time it. According to the minutes of the Centerville City Trails Committee meeting held Thursday, April 10, 2008, the pictographs had been damaged:

Mark Day reported he hiked to the Fremont pictographs in Parrish Canyon, and he said they have been vandalized. He said some of the pictographs have been scratched, and others have been rubbed out. (Trails Committee Meeting Minutes)

So we set off to see if we could take some pictograph photographs. I will show you first the path we took to the pictographs and then in the next post the pictographs themselves.

Parrish Canyon Fremont Pictographs

We set off on the trail. We got lost. Asked directions. Continued.

Parrish Canyon Fremont Pictographs

When you get to the bridge, cross it and turn right.

Parrish Canyon Fremont Pictographs

Take a picture of the waterfall and continue.

Parrish Canyon Fremont Pictographs

Follow the creek just like Connie and Susan are doing here.

At this point in a normal blog you would see the pictographs. But there are too many photographs already so the pictographs are in the next post.

Parrish Canyon Fremont Pictographs

Paul and Mike continued onward and upward. I followed. I wish I hadn't.

Parrish Canyon Fremont Pictographs

We got back before the others and met Merrill on Red.

Parrish Canyon Fremont Pictographs

Red is an Arabian Paint and his real name is in Russian which I can't pronounce much less spell.

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Feeding Farmington Fowl

Bryson is learning to feed the ducks, or in this instance, geese. His coaches are Jill and Susan. They are at Farmington Pond. It appears these fowl will not wait long in a breadline. If you cannot see the video, click here.



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Utah Shakespearean Festival: Adams Theatre Backstage Tour

Adams Shakespearean TheatreSo far I have written about The 39 Steps, Much Ado about Nothing, Pride and Prejudice, The Greenshow and the Randall Theatre Backstage Tour. The Adams Shakespearean Theatre Backstage Tour is just a continuation of the Randall Theatre Backstage Tour. The whole tour takes 90 minutes.

The Festival website states:

The Adams Shakespearean Theatre, dedicated in 1977, was designed by Douglas N. Cook, Festival producing artistic director, along with Max Anderson of the Utah State Building Board, and is patterned after drawings and research of sixteenth century Tudor stages. Experts say it is one of a few theatres that probably comes close to the design of the Globe Theatre in which Shakespeare’s plays were originally produced. It is so authentic, in fact, that the British Broadcasting Company filmed part of its Shakespeare series there. It is named for Grace Adams Tanner, a major benefactor of the Festival, and her parents, Thomas D. and Luella R. Adams. It seats 819, plus 66 gallery-bench or standing-room seats.

I took a few more photographs on this last leg of the tour. Backstage there is less room and little storage space compared with the Randall Theatre. There are plans for the New Shakespeare Theatre with a goal of completing the fundraising campaign in time to celebrate the Festival’s fiftieth anniversary season in 2011.

The new theatre, including the lobby, will be enclosed in a glass “shell” with a retractable roof to bring the outdoors into the theatre. I have included a photograph of a scale model of the theatre below.

Adams Shakespearean Theatre

Fog producing machine

Fog producing machine

Adams Theatre trapdoor

Adams Theatre trapdoor

Model of the New Shakespeare Theatre

Model of the New Shakespeare Theatre

Next: Cedar Breaks National Monument
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Utah Shakespearean Festival: Randall Theatre Backstage Tour

Randall Jones TheatreAfter The 39 Steps and Much Ado about Nothing but before Pride and Prejudice and The Greenshow, Jill and I toured the Randall L. Jones Theatre backstage. The building was built completely with private funds. It was named after a former Southern Utah University shop professor whose family donated funds for the theater.

The Festival website states:

The Randall L. Jones Theatre, dedicated in 1989, was designed by the firm of Fowler, Ferguson, Kingston, and Ruben, with theatrical design by the California firm of Landry and Bogan, as well as Cameron Harvey, Festival producing artistic director. It was built at a cost of $5.5 million, to expand the Festival’s offerings, especially in the area of world classics, and was featured in the August 1990 edition of Architecture magazine. The theatre is named after a Cedar City native known as the father of tourism in southern Utah. It seats 769.

On the Backstage Tour we got to see what it really takes to produce a major dramatic production. We learned about theatre sets, costumes, and lighting and the designers and technicians who bring it all to life. Our tour guide was one of the costume technicians and she was able to knowledgeably answer our questions.

Jill asked for permission to take a few photographs and it was granted. Click on the images to enlarge.

Randall Theatre backstage

Randall Theatre backstage. In the far corner is the set for Great Expectations.

Great Expectations set

The set for Great Expectations

Randall Theatre trapdoor

Randall Theatre trapdoor

Wigs ready for showtime

Wigs ready for showtime

Next: The Adams Shakespearean Theatre Backstage Tour
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Utah Shakespearean Festival: The Greenshow

The GreenshowThere was more to our visit to the Utah Shakespearean Festival than The 39 Steps, Much Ado about Nothing, and Pride and Prejudice. Not only were there more plays but there were such diversions as The Greenshow. The Greenshow is a series of complimentary performances presented six nights a week, prior to the evening theatrical performances. There are also several comely “tarts” selling Elizabethan fare.

The Utah Shakespearean Festival website has this to say:

The perfect mood enhancer for the Festival’s productions can be found each summer evening on the beautiful green and courtyard surrounding the Adams Shakespearean Theatre. The Greenshow features the spirited song, dance, and costumes of Shakespeare’s day, and it’s free! Add storytelling, juggling, and Elizabethan sweets, and you’ll have a fun-filled frolic to prepare you for the main stage performance that follows.

This time I only saw a few minutes of The Greenshow — just long enough to snap a couple of photographs. In prior visits I have watched a whole show for they are very entertaining.

The Greenshow

Next: The Randall L. Jones Theatre Backstage Tour

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