Recollections of Edith Andersen Holst

Easter 1959

Easter 1959. Edith center rear and Delores rear far right

My guest writer is Jill Willoughby, oldest grandchild of Edith Andersen Holst.

This is a letter that Dolores Price wrote to me, dated 24 July 1998, where she tells us she could not make the reunion that year as they would be in Denver. She wrote this additional information about her mother, Edith:

Delores Price

As a young teenager she did housework for Norma Lee who lived in a big house on about 2nd North and Main. She was a hard worker and picked fruit to make money so she could give her children a wonderful Xmas. She loved Xmas and enjoyed going from house to house seeing her brothers and families Christmas.

She could sew beautifully. I can remember my 1st grade teacher having me stand up to show the class a dress Mother had made. Mother and Dolly Rockwood would make Betty and I pretty dresses and bonnets. We both were bald and they would sew hair in bonnets. I have pictures with hair in my eyes and others bald as a cue ball.

She made all our clothes including coats. I was in 8th grade when I got my first store coat. She worked for many years at the cannery and was the fastest tomato peeler they had. I can remember seeing a huge pan of tomatoes coming around the belts announcing that Mother had reached a large number of peeled pans.

When she went to work at the leather factory she was the fastest and best sewer they had. I think she enjoyed working there and made lots of friends, her best friend was Mildred Snow. She made leather coats for family and friends making leather cowboy coats for her grandchildren.

I (Jill) worked at the same factory that Grandma Edith had been at and knew Mildred. I had several conversations with Mildred about Grandma in the early 1970s. I can relate to the hard work Grandma had to do there and how dirty you would get working with the leather. I used many of the sewing machines and probably used one of the same ones Grandma did.

The letter from Delores continues:

She loved picnics and going to the mountains especially up to Glenn’s and Graces. Grace and Mother would put their feet in the creek with great enjoyment. She was close to her brothers and sisters-in-law. We were the first to get a TV and brothers and friends would come and watch wrestling also they liked to play penny poker.

When I was teaching at Bear River High, I bought the red kitchen set for her birthday as a surprise. When they delivered it she made them take it back because she thought they had the wrong house. The store called me at the school to tell me about it and I told them to redelivery it. She was thrilled!

Terry Draper

I remember my Grandma Edith Holst. She would always hug me and I knew she loved me very much.

She worked as a seamstress and she would sew her grandchildren dresses and coats. She would sew a tag into each garment that said, “Made Especially for you by Edith Holst.”

I was able to stay overnight and sometimes for several weeks in the summer. I stayed with my cousins Jill and Susan who also lived in Brigham City.

I remember my Grandma Holst loved to watch the Lawrence Welk Show on Saturday nights. She made wonderful creamed peas and new potatoes. She was a wonderful cook and many family members would be over to enjoy meals together. I remember many birthday parties and picnics in her back yard. I remember the tire swing in the yard.

Grandma usually always had an apron on when she was at home. I remember that she had red wall paper in her kitchen and I remember that the ironing board was in the wall. I remember the drawer in the kitchen that held crayons and paper dolls and such for the grandkids to use.

I remember when I slept over we would usually sleep on the living room floor. I would stay awake to the sounds of many diesel trucks that passed by. The home was on 678 North Main and this was before the freeway.

My favorite part of Grandma and Grandpa Holst’s yard was the weeping willow tree in the front yard. I loved to run around in the branches that hung down. I also loved the Bing cherry tree in the yard next to the garage. The cherries were the sweetest and biggest cherries I ever tasted. To this day I haven’t found any cherries to match. There were many cherry trees in the back and sometimes I got to help pick. I remember picking raspberries.

I remember that Jill and Susan and Julie and I would climb out the basement window while Grandma was at work. While she was a work she would give us some money to walk to the store down the street and buy triple decker ice cream cones.

Grandma would wear a hat and earring when she went to church or somewhere nice. I remember that her earrings had little cushions in the back of them. When Grandpa and Grandma Holst came to our home in Sandy there was always a present for each of us in her suitcase.

I remember many birthday parties in August for my Mom and my birthday were at Lagoon. I have many wonderful memories of Grandma watching us on the little boats and cars and other kiddie rides. I remember Grandma Holst loved Christmas and she would make clothes for us, and give us many presents. Christmas was wonderful at Grandma’s house.

The main thing I remember of Grandma Holst was that she was so very loving. She died on my 13th birthday and I will never forget her. She was a wonderful wife, Mother and Grandmother and I hear stories that she was a very fun Aunt.

Jill, Edith, and Terry

Jill, Edith, and Terry on Valentines Day

The Series

Posts in the series will be added here as they are published.

Edith Andersen Holst Part 3

Edith's children: Glenna, Dolores, and Robert

Edith's children: Glenna, Dolores, and Robert

My guest writer is Jill Willoughby, oldest grandchild of Edith Andersen Holst.

This is the third of three parts of the history of my grandmother, written by her on 21 May 1960. I have included Edith’s handwritten history in the first post.

Edith Andersen Holst, born 25 March 1908, died 10 August 1966, age 58.

In the park (click to enlarge)

Edith and Ross with their children and grandchildren

We have three children, Dolores born January 23, 1928. She married David Price and live in Salt Lake City, Utah. She taught school in Bear River 2 years also after being married she taught at West High also at Hillside Jr. High. She has three children Julie Anne, Cindy Sue & Kenneth David Price.

Robert was born in 3 Oct 1930. He married Janet Joy Jensen they have 4 children Jill Annette, Susan Joy, Scott Robert and Randy Ross Holst. He graduated from High School, joined the National & was called to active duty in the Korean campaign 19 Aug 1950. Received a honorable discharge as Sergeant 20 April 1952, graduated from National School for Radio & T.Y. 1955.

Glenna Ann was born 9 Aug 1932 she married Earl Lynn Andersen they live in Salt Lake City Utah. They both work in the church Lynn just completed a home missionary in 1960. They have 5 children Terry Ann, Michael Lynn, Deborah Kay, Diane Edith and Sandra.

The Edith Series

Posts in the series will be added here as they are published.

A page from the history of Edith's brother Glen showing Edith's children

A page from the history of Edith's brother Glen showing Edith's children

Edith Andersen Holst Part 2

Edith Holst (click to enlarge)My guest writer is Jill Willoughby, oldest grandchild of Edith Andersen Holst.

This is the second of three parts of the history of my grandmother, written by her on 21 May 1960. I have included Edith’s handwritten history in the first post.

Edith Andersen Holst, born 25 March 1908, died 10 August 1966, age 58.

I was married in the Salt Lake court house August the 18, 1927, then married in the Salt Lake Temple, 3rd of October 1928 — before Dolores was born. We first lived in the upstairs of mother’s home for a few months. We then bought a new bedroom set with pink roses painted on it, new grey stove and blue kitchen set. I was so thrilled with it all.

Then we moved down to Gram. Holst till we was able to move in a 2 room apt at Aunt Bell Squires on 7th North Main. We lived there when Dolores was born. I remember when Uncle Dave broke his leg. When Dolores would cry toward morning Uncle Dave would make Aunt Bell get up and come & get her, change & play with her. They both were like angels to us all & we loved them very much.

We then moved to 6th North & Main in a 2 room & a room upstairs. Robert and Glenna was born there. We thought a new one was on the way and we decided to build on. Bill Smith came down and started to dig the foundation in. While we were building we lived with my mother Zina.

I worked in the cannery every season and picked strawberries. Then I went to work at the American Sportswear. I have worked there about 20 years. When I was 17 years old I taught Sunday School with Florence Dunn also after I was married a few years. Ross and I are on the old folks committee, put in 1959.

Coats made by Edith

Coats made by Edith. L-R Rear: Randy, Janet, Lynn, Robert, Glenna. L-R Front: Jill, Susan, Terry, Mike, Scott, Debbie


To be continued.

The Edith Series

Posts in the series will be added here as they are published.

Edith Andersen Holst

Edith with her mother and brothers

Edith with her mother and brothers

My guest writer is Jill Willoughby, oldest grandchild of Edith Andersen Holst.

This is the first of three parts of the history of my grandmother, written by her on 21 May 1960. I have included Edith’s handwritten history in this post.

Edith Andersen Holst, born 25 March 1908, died 10 August 1966, age 58.

Edith Andersen Holst

Edith Andersen Holst

I was born 25 March 1908, in Brigham City, Utah, a second child of Louis and Zina Jensen Andersen. I was raised and lived in Brigham City, Utah all my life.

My first home was in the first ward on 2nd East and 1st South, then we moved to 1st North & Main in a large red brick home. I remember cleaning the long stair case with a nail, brush and rag and taking all day to do it. I attended the Lincoln School for 6 years and it is located on the corner of 1st West and 3rd North. I went to Box Elder Jr. High 2 years and High School three years.

I quit school and went to work at Andy Pathakis Bakery. Spending most of my money on shoes and pretty hats also presents for Ben who was operated on his face and was very sick for a long time. A spider bit him and he had a tube in his cheek for a long time. He was the baby brother.

I also have 4 brothers and one sister who died when she was about 6 years old from typhoid fever. We had the funeral on the front lawn. My older brother is Edwin Lewis Andersen, Glen Lewis, Raymond Lorenzo and Benjamin Rex Andersen, I was the 2nd child and Alice was the fifth.

Some more photographs of Edith, when she was young.

Edith Andersen Holst life history part 1

Life History part 1

Edith Andersen Holst life history part 2

Life History part 2

 
To be continued.

The Edith Series

Posts in the series will be added here as they are published.

Christmas Letter 2010

Mexican cruise

Hi Friends and Family,

This is our third annual Christmas Letter blog post. We will send the URL to this page to friends and family with their Christmas cards. It has been a great year for our family. Here are a few highlights:

Steven and Adelaide welcomed a new baby, Cassandra Ruth Willoughby (Cassie) in June. Aurora had her first birthday party in February and is a good big sister. They are enjoying their new home. If you go on over to Ada Shot Me there is a fun video to watch about Cassandra.

Derek was able to obtain employment in Utah so he and Sarah loaded up the U-Haul and moved back home. Grandparents are so happy that Bryson is able to visit more often and play with all the toys and cousins. We enjoyed his second birthday party by building and racing balloon cars.

Paul and Jake graduated from the University of Utah in Computer Engineering. They are both working for Hill Air Force Base and have traveled to Texas twice already for a project they worked on.

Paul, working on one of his many projects, made use of some empty barrels.

Robert and his 80th Birthday Cake

Robert and his 80th Birthday Cake

Jake announced his engagement to Rachel and they will be married December 15th in the Bountiful temple. Rachel is a beautiful young woman and is attending Weber University in Family Studies. After a cruise honeymoon to the Bahamas they will live in Roy.

Rick and Jill celebrated 30 years of marriage in August. Earlier in the year they visited Sarah’s family in Texas and toured the Cowboys Stadium, Battleship Texas, San Jacinto Monument, and the Johnson Space Center.

In March Rick and Jake visited all the California and Nevada temples during Spring break. They did a year’s worth of temple work in less than a week. One of Jake’s photographs that he took on the trip was used by the Church on its temples home page at lds.org.

Daniel, our youngest, is coming home after serving his mission in three different missions — Alabama, Mongolia and Washington. He will have served 2 years and 47 days (not that we are counting). Daniel will come home December 14th just in time to attend his brother’s wedding.

Rick planned a fun 30th anniversary trip for us to the Shakespearean Festival in Cedar City where Jill got to see Pride and Prejudice and other plays.

Jill has been on two fun trips with her extended family. In June we traveled on the Skunk Train in the California Redwoods. In October we celebrated our Dad’s 80th birthday by going on a cruise to the Mexican Riviera on the Carnival Cruise line Splendor. We enjoyed the Extreme Canopy Zip Line in Puerto Vallarta, a city tour in Mazatlan, shopping and snorkeling in Cabo San Lucas and tons of great food and fun. We were joined at a family dinner at Maddox by other family members for the historic 80th birthday.

We hope you have a very Merry Christmas,

Rick and Jill

Salt Flats, Utah

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge 2010

My guest writer today is my wife Jill. In the last year she has lost 29 pounds.

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Jill, on lap 2, is enjoying the race

Weight Watchers issued a Walk-It Challenge two months ago. Everyone was encouraged by our inspiring leader Lois to do something challenging even if that meant walking to the mail box and adding some more steps each day.

We decided to run and found the on-line training guide that started with walk 5 minutes, run for 2 minutes and then walk again. Four days a week the time running was gradually increased until we could actually run up to 20 minutes twice with a 1 minute walk in between. We all added MP3 music to make the running more enjoyable. I borrowed my niece’s player — sorry about washing your MP3 player, Shauna.

Weight Watchers Walk-It ChallengeEach week there were reasons why we couldn’t go but there was always one of the four of us that wanted to meet the goal and encouraged the others. Mostly Shauna who is not a Weight Watchers member. We found it easiest to run when it was cool even if it rained. Some of the places we found to run were the Legacy Parkway Trail, the Lagoon Trail, Davis High School track, West Bountiful and Kaysville trails and Utah Botanical Center. We liked the paths with no hills the best.

The objective was for each Weight Watchers member to earn a charm by participating in a 5K. We were excited and ordered the T-Shirt and put the URL of our web site on the back.

Our Walk-It was held in Centerville at noon and consisted of going around the outskirts of the park 3 ½ times until the 3.1 miles was achieved. There was a good turnout even though it was hot. We were very excited to have Kent and Rick along as photographers and to write the captions. And check out the videos at the end of this post.

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

The participants met at the Ward's home before travelling to the race.

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

The athletes looked relaxed just prior to the start. No anxiety here.

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Weight Watchers leader Lois instructs the runners for the start.

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

An unconventional confetti start sees Susan take an early lead just ten yards out.

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Shauna has already moved ahead but Susan still leads the main pack.

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

"We have been running 4 times a week and the consistency pays off in weight loss and health benefits."

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Shauna increases her lead.

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Susan: "I was hoping to run the entire time but it was hot."

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Susan: "I got a side ache the 2nd lap so I slowed down but it didn’t go away. I ended walking to get rid of it."

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

"Four laps around the park finishing the fourth lap down the middle through the trees."

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

"Today was more of a struggle than I had hoped for as I drank too much water before the run."

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Melissa keeps up the pressure. She is going to give Jill the run of her life.

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Shauna along the finishing stretch.

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Shauna 33:29

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Susan is next to enter the last tenth of a mile.

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Susan 39:58

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Melissa and Jill are urged on to the finish by Shauna.

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Melissa 41:18 - Jill 41:21

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Melissa: "Our times were a little slower than Monday’s 5K, but the temperature was a lot hotter so we’re all happy with what we got."

Weight Watchers Walk-It Challenge

Good work, wife.

Videos

If you cannot see the videos click here.



Christmas Letter 2009

Merry Christmas from Rick and Jill

Merry Christmas from Rick and Jill

Hi Friends and Family,

Here is our second Christmas blog post. We will send to friends and family the URL to this page with their Christmas cards. It has been a very busy year and here are a few highlights:

Steven and Adelaide had a baby girl, Aurora, born in February. They just bought their first home in Layton. It was good timing as they announced the arrival of baby number two due June 26th.

Jill, Kent, Susan, Melissa, Shauna, Scott, Connor and Ashley took our dad on a trip to Nevada’s Virginia City to ride the historic steam-engine on the Virginia and Truckee Railroad. Some of us went on a river raft trip while the others rode across Lake Tahoe on the Emerald Bay Sightseeing Cruise.

Sarah and Derek moved to Keller, Texas. Rick, Paul and Jill drove down to visit in March. We enjoyed the sights in Dallas and Fort Worth and Rick published a book about the historic water park there. Jill flew down in October to help Bryson celebrate his first birthday. We enjoyed a mini vacation visiting the Alamo in San Antonio.

Adelaide graduated in May with a Bachelor’s degree in English. She managed to finish school while being pregnant and having a baby so they graduated together.

Daniel is serving in the Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia mission and has helped construct a ger, taught English, and helped baptize the good people there.

Aurora starred in “All Things Bright And Beautiful

Paul is graduating this month in Computer Engineering from the University of Utah. He hopes to work at Hill Air Force Base or maybe stay where he is, working for Avalon Care Centers. Jake is studying in the same field and will graduate in May.

And Jake went skydiving.

We hope you have a very Merry Christmas,

Rick and Jill

Rick, Jill, Steven, Adelaide, Aurora, Paul, Sarah, Bryson, Jake, and Derek at Alexandra's wedding.

Rick, Jill, Steven, Adelaide, Aurora, Paul, Sarah, Bryson, Jake, and Derek at Alexandra's wedding.

Preparing A Missionary

Today my wife spoke in church.

Daniel receives his mission nametag from his mother

Daniel receives his missionary nametag from his mother

Our five children were born within seven years of each other so are really close in age. When they were small our favorite song in FHE was “I’m so glad when daddy comes home“.  Instead of a great big kiss at the end of the song, the kids would tackle dad and wrestle with him on the floor until one of the kids got hurt and then the song was over. Our other favorite song was “I Hope They Call Me on a Mission” when I have grown a foot or two. I hope by then I will be ready to teach and preach and work as missionaries do. I have been asked to talk on preparing a missionary. Our oldest son served in Santiago Chile West, the next son served in California Oakland Spanish speaking, the third son served in Mexico City North and our last son is serving in the Ulaanbaatar Mongolia mission.

I don’t have anything profound or new to share, just four simple things we did in our family.

1. Family Home Evening

I am glad to be able to teach primary to an amazing group of eight year old children in our ward. They are bright and happy and it is very apparent that these children are being taught the gospel in their home. They know how to say a prayer, they are learning to read the scriptures and starting to memorize the articles of faith. They have wonderful parents. These children have parents that follow the counsel we have all been taught about holding a regular FHE, scripture study and family prayer. We had times in our own family when we were consistent and able to do these things but there were other times when family scripture study, FHE or family prayer just didn’t happen. We had our share of teenagers that came to FHE and remained in a prone position on the floor with their eyes closed the entire time. But we never decided it wasn’t worth the effort and we never stopped trying.

2. Home Teaching

Jake tracting in Mexico.

Jake tracting in Mexico.

We have been fortunate to have the best home teacher in the stake for the past twenty years or so. During all the time he was a counselor in the stake presidency and then as our stake president, he never missed a month home teaching. I’m not sure how many home teachers are that faithful. We got to know all the Hulse boys over the years — young Loren, young Nathan and finally young Joseph. They learned to set up appointments by calling us on the phone or talking to us in person. They learned how to shake hands in greeting and how to prepare and give a message. I’m grateful for Brother Hulse and his example and love for our family. I’m also grateful to my husband, Richard, and the families in our ward that allowed our boys to home teach and learn these skills.

President Monson said:

Brethren, is every ordained teacher given the assignment to home teach? What an opportunity to prepare for a mission. What a privilege to learn the discipline of duty. A boy will automatically turn from concern for self when he is assigned to “watch over” others. (Thomas S. Monson, “The Call to Serve,” Ensign, Nov 2000, 47–49)

3. Savings Account

We were our children’s employers while they were young so they could learn to manage money. As Richard was the main force behind this topic, he agreed to write how the savings accounts were managed:

A black hole has a one-way surface, called an event horizon, into which objects can fall, but out of which nothing can escape. It is called “black” because it absorbs all the light that hits it, reflecting nothing.

Thus a black hole mission savings account will not allow any deposited money to escape. The one exception made is for a mission.

We set up mission savings accounts at the bank for all the children when they were young. The accounts were set up so that their Dad’s signature was required to withdraw money. The children were required to put 50% of any earnings into their account. When they were old enough for Scouts, ten dollars was paid into their accounts for each completed merit badge. An Eagle required 21 merit badges which meant each boy earned a deposit of $210.

Remember Richard wrote this part for me:

One day my wife said the children wanted to change the mandated percentage. It sounded like a rebellion and my wife appeared to be siding with the children. I called a family council and planned for the worst. The new percentage that the children wanted was to change it from 50% to 40%. So after tithing they would still retain half their money to spend. I pretended to reluctantly agree and was happy they would still be saving a substantial proportion of their earnings.

After a few years I removed the percentage requirement but the children still contributed heavily into their black hole accounts. Their percentage would sometimes be much higher than the old 40% rate.
All four boys earned all their mission money this way. Our daughter, Sarah, was exempt from saving for a mission but the account was still a black hole. She could withdraw money for parental approved activities like marriage and buying Fathers Day gifts.

She used it to go the Europe instead.

We tried to help some of the children with dating and other expenses to allow them to focus on saving for their missions. One of our sons worked at Lagoon in Group Foods for a summer when he was 15. He went to work happy and came home covered with grease from having slaved over a hot grill frying hamburgers all day. But he came home just as happy as when he left because he was earning money for his mission.

4. School and Church Activities

Most of our children studied a foreign language in Junior High. President Hinckley said:

Study a foreign language if you have opportunity to do so. You may never be called to a land where that language is spoken, but the study will have given you a better understanding of your own tongue or of another tongue you may be asked to acquire. (Gordon B. Hinckley, “Tithing: An Opportunity to Prove Our Faithfulness,” Ensign, May 1982, 40)

Paul with a little girl.

Paul with a little girl.

I’m grateful to the good youth leaders from our ward that served over the years. They took the boys camping even in the winter and organized terrific youth camps and treks. There were lots of great service projects that helped the boys learn to work and serve others.  Participating in ward activities, attending church and going to seminary helped build the enthusiasm for serving a mission.

What young man wouldn’t look forward to the adventure of eating sheep head, goat stomach, and horse pizza? Daniel, who is serving in Mongolia, also looks forward to the day his eyelashes freeze his eyes shut. When I asked Daniel what helped prepare him to serve a mission, he wrote:

To Mom:

The things that helped me prepare for a mission the most were the small and simple things we were taught to do every week and day. Scripture study, prayer, attending church, and opportunities to serve others. I am happy that I always liked going to church. I can’t really remember a day when I wanted to stay home and not go. I learned that from Dad and your example of always going yourselves. Also I don’t know how you taught me, or where I learned it from, but the discipline to wake up every morning is very helpful. I just remember always waking up myself with my alarm for school every day, and giving me that responsibility early was probably a good idea. That seems to be a struggle for some missionaries.

After turning 18 years old, going to mission prep class each week really helped. It made me want to go and got me excited about it. I learned a lot from there, especially how to take notes from teachers in that kind of setting, as in the MTC there is tons of things to take notes on.

Other important preparation was just the fact that I knew Dad and you loved me and always wanted to help. Sharing of your testimony and love for the gospel were all things that influenced me to get ready to serve a mission.

Daniel is not allowed to proselyte but serves the Mongolian people by teaching English and can share the gospel with those that express an interest. He writes:

We did two big service projects this week. One was on Friday for a member in the branch. She needed her fence to be moved since the ground where it was no longer could support it. We had most of the members in our district get to work. As I was working it reminded me of my summer job. I had the thought that, “I worked all summer earning money for my mission digging fence holes, and now I’m on my mission digging fence holes.” It made me laugh. We were able to finish the project and it looked good.

I wish I could show you a picture of the fence they moved. It consisted of some logs with the rusted tops of barrels connected eight lids across and four lids down. It is an interesting structure but I wouldn’t call it a fence.

In 1993 Elder Neal A. Maxwell of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles dedicated Mongolia for the preaching of the gospel, and the Ulaanbaatar Branch was organized that same year. Today, the Mongolian members of our Church number 9,000, reportedly the largest group of Christians in the country.

Couple Missionaries

Steven's welcome home sign as he returns from his mission.

Steven's welcome home sign as he returns from his mission.

We have been counseled to get out of debt. President Threadgold said he hoped we all had a 401-M account in place in preparation for our mission. I’d like to share an experience from the blog of a couple now serving in Mongolia.

The people of Mongolia sometimes seem to be caught between a rock and a hard place. Universities and Colleges here are not as robust as we find elsewhere, like in the States. They are improving but still have some catching up to do. So, many companies located here in the capitol city of Ulaanbaatar ask for a college degree from a foreign university in order to qualify for their best jobs. But it is very difficult for most here to be able to handle that kind of expense. Particularly when a young family is involved. Sometimes, fathers have left their families to secure the needed degree, something we worry much about.

Then, a couple of months ago, Brigham Young University – Hawaii campus announced the offering of new online classes which students could register for and take over the Internet. What a tremendous blessing! Students can actually complete up to three years of college over the Internet. The final year they must spend on campus. But that is much better than four years!

Interest was high here, as one might expect. We knew the tremendous benefit this could be and tried to pass the word around. We would learn later that Mongolia would account for 50% of all enrollments in the entire Asia area!

The couple wanted to help by setting up a computer lab in the mission home. They tried lots of different ways to get the needed computers.

We finally contacted the BYU-Hawaii administrator over the online program, Brother Griffiths. He said they were in the process of upgrading computers and he would bring them personally. We worried about customs and the enormous charges that might be incurred.  We finally greeted Brother Griffiths as he made his way through the airport. We weren’t seeing what we had expected by way of boxes, etc. in which computers might be transported. So we figured they might still be making their way through customs and we would need to pick them up somewhere.

But finally we asked him how it went with the computers. And he said, “Great! They’re all right here in my bags!” He had packed them all in his luggage, only needing to pay for one extra suitcase! They didn’t even bother to ask him his name. Just checked him through without even saying “goodbye”! And he had twelve computers — six laptops and six desktops without monitors. Twelve of them!

This is the impact just one couple is making by serving a mission.

A quarterly newsletter is emailed to us telling us news from the Mongolia mission. This was recently written:

Re-upping is something that two of our senior missionary couples are doing. Elder and Sister Olpin have recently returned from a 3-month break in the US to serve a second mission in Mongolia. Elder and Sister Anderson finished their first mission in Mongolia on September 2. They will be back in November to serve their second mission here. Our complement for senior couples is 14, but we have never had more than 11 couples in the country during the past 2 years — right now we have 7. We are constantly pestering the Mission Department to send more.

Elder Tingey said that the senior couples are the scaffolding for building the Church. This is so apparent in Mongolia. We love our senior couples!

In the D&C we read “Behold, the Lord requireth the heart and a willing mind”. (D&C 64:34)

In the May 2001 Ensign Elder Robert D. Hales said:

What is the best way to teach our children — and grandchildren — light and truth?  What is the most important way to set our families, both immediate and extended, in order?  Is it possible that in spiritual matters our example speaks louder than our words?  Temple marriage, family prayer, scripture study, and family home evening are all vitally important. But there is another dimension — the dimension of service. If we are willing to leave our loved ones for service in the mission field, we will bless them with a heritage that will teach and inspire them for generations to come. (Robert D. Hales, “Couple Missionaries: A Time to Serve,” Ensign, May 2001, 25)

I hope they call me on a mission, when I have shrunk an inch or two. I hope by then I will be ready to teach and preach and work as missionaries do.

Sarah inside the Colosseum on her European tour.

Sarah inside the Colosseum on her European tour.

Willard Bay Wakeboarding

On Friday, my brother Scott took some extended family members boating at Willard Bay. Willard Bay State Park rests atop the Great Salt Lake flood plain in northern Utah. Its 9,900 acres of fresh water provide boating, water-skiing and year-round fishing for crappie, walleye, wiper and catfish. Camping also is popular at the park. An earth filled dike and natural shoreline make up the 20-mile enclosures.

The water was cold but several brave cousins gave wakeboarding a try, including Steven. Aurora had her first boat ride ever and almost fell asleep she was so comfortable in the life vest. She also enjoyed the cotton trees in the breeze that made a giant mobile. We enjoyed premade sandwiches from Costco on a nice man-made beach. Tons of sand was hauled in from Brigham City during a recent renovation. Connor likes to fish and caught a large catfish that he wanted his uncle to cook for him. Anyone care to join in the feast?


Adelaide, Aurora, and Jill on Willard Bay

Adelaide, Aurora, and Jill on Willard Bay